Tracery and deconstruction

Every now and then, my love of experimentation gets the better of me and I eagerly set convention aside to try some ‘different’ forms of quilling.

DSCF7273Regular readers of this blog will know that I often like to cut things up when trying something new, and a few weeks ago I tried cutting through some of the spiracles (loops) of an eccentric coil, just to see what interesting things might happen! I’m not a particularly enthusiastic cook, but I do enjoy watching the TV programme Masterchef, and I’ve noticed that the chefs in the competition are often very keen to ‘deconstruct’ classic dishes, presenting familiar ingredients in different and surprising forms. I had this in mind while I played with my eccentric coil, looking for ways in which I might cut the loops and then put them back together in new ways. The shape shown on the left is the result!

Once I started, I realised that there are all sorts of ways in which the spiracles of a coil can be shaped and repositioned … and I also could not resist inserting a few new coils inside the loops of the original one! Incidentally, all this has strong echoes of the cut coil flowers that I wrote about a while ago, and which I believe also offer some interesting potential.

After seeing my ‘deconstructed’ eccentric coil in a post on Facebook, Jane Jenkins asked me whether I had tried deconstructing a husking, so I decided to give that a go too. I fiddled about with a wheatear and also an alternate side looped husking, but didn’t really get very far with either – both the shapes are just too linear. I’ve concluded that spirals offer far more opportunities for creative variation than straight, narrow loops, but if further inspiration strikes I will definitely let you know!

The other thing I’ve been experimenting with is an attempt to reproduce Gothic architectural tracery patterns in quilling. In architecture, tracery is the network of interlaced ornamental stone ‘ribs’ which can be seen supporting the intricate panels of stained glass windows – I have often admired this feature when visiting old English churches and cathedrals. Tracery gives us beautiful trefoil and quatrefoil shapes which are formed by positioning incomplete circles together. I’ve found that it’s possible to recreate these patterns in quilling, simply by cutting regular sections out of ring coils. To achieve consistency in my cut circles, I’ve made marks on the dowels that I roll the rings around so that I always make the cuts in exactly the same place. Then, with a little imagination and careful gluing, I’ve managed to create the simple tracery-style quilling that you see below. Experiments are ongoing!

tracery card

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3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Margaret Jones
    Jan 04, 2016 @ 00:55:53

    I’ve never really ‘gotten’ the deconstruction in cooking Philippa, to me it’s just changing the recipe around or if it doesn’t work out then just say it was deconstructed, lol. However, I love your deconstruction of the coils and what you did with them. I can look at your deconstructed coils and ‘put them together again’ (can’t do that with a deconstructed meal, lol). I love the black with the metallic edge too, it makes it very real looking. I remember Brenda Rhodes used cut ring coils to make a pattern on a card, it was more a space filler instead of the centrepiece but that was a good use too. Love learning from the Masters!

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    Reply

    • quilliance
      Jan 04, 2016 @ 07:54:04

      The rate you are going, you’ll soon be a Master yourself, Margaret! Inventiveness is a gift, I think, and so is appreciation of it. Perhaps you will have a go at some deconstruction too?

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

  2. Trackback: Mullions, transoms and tracery | Quilliance ... a new chapter

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